What I’d like focus on this week for our MMM is what I call Newness.

This week we enter into a new time zone. It’s the Spring celebration of the creation of the world, which parallels the Fall celebration we call Rosh Hashana. The Spring celebration occurs on Adar 25, which is a creation day. That’s definitely Newness.

And next Shabbat is Rosh Chodesh Nisan, the beginning of the month of Nisan. And, as Torah describes, it, this is THE New Beginning, as there are ten crowns, or ten things that began on this day in the past. The service of the Temple and selection of the Kohen, for two examples.

It’s also the beginning of the New Year of Months, the first of 12 months of the new year. The word “chodesh” corresponds to the word “kiddush” in Hebrew. It’s a chief renewal time of year, a Newness time of the year.

It’s a time of Chesed. There are 72 days between the the 25th of Adar until Shavuot, so it’s a period of time which corresponds to pure abundance and goodness, of free, effortless Chesed. It’s a type of Newness which comes without our own efforts; it’s just there for the receiving, if you choose to receive it.

It’s a Newness which is always characterized by Spring, because when Spring comes in it allows us to try out new things. It’s a time of birthing, of renewal and Newness.

Newness is a synonym for the word “beginning.” And beginning informs us about a lot of spiritual powers that are available in this particular time of year. I think the unique aspect of beginning is this – when G-d creates something, in the world, in Torah, in anything, G-d already has the end established in the beginning.

So, when G-d created the world, he saw what the end would be, from the very beginning. The Newness power of the beginning reveals the end, and unravels a whole path for us to go there.

Also, everything goes after the beginning. If you have a strong beginning of a day, of a year, of a relationship, or whatever it may be, that strong beginning will determine the continuation of the process you’re going through.

One of the explanations for the Hebrew people coming out of Eqypt was the beginning. It was the beginning of a nation, of the Jewish people, and it happened so quickly they didn’t even have time to let their dough rise. That’s why we eat unleavened matzot that doesn’t rise.

In order to facilitate a beginning, we needed something detached from time, something extra-ordinary or supernatural so that our whole identity as a nation would be above-nature.  Also we have a beginning that’s a core point, one that motivates everything else we do.

Since G-d looked into the Torah and created the world, Torah is the inner code of life, all the wisdom of life and all that happens in life. The more you go back to the beginning, the more all-inclusive that beginning is. Inside of Bereshit, the “in the beginning” first parsha, first verse and first word, everything else that follows is inter-included within it. That shows the power of beginning as well.

The beginning is also something that determines the way you will act throughout the rest of the process. When you jump out of bed saying, “thank you, Hashem,” you’re going to have a happy, “thank you, Hashem,” kind of day. Or, you can have the opposite, if that’s what you choose.

A beginning may tend to make things difficult, too, which is probably designed to get us to leave our comfort zones and lead us into a higher place. And a beginning is an entranceway, a portal to “beyondness,” a place of transcendence, a place we’re never been. That’s the power of beginnings as well.

These are some of the ideas for my Newness MMM, hopefully we’ll start this week.